Riding a motorbike: How can you protect yourself against the consequences of an accident?

Riding a motorbike: How can you protect yourself against the consequences of an accident?

Fancy riding a motorbike? With the right insurance you can relax when you're on the road. However, it's not particularly easy to find out how best to insure yourself. Here you will learn what you really need.

Before getting going, all insurance-related matters need to be sorted. Without compulsory liability insurance, you will not even be able to register your vehicle with the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Office. Liability insurance covers damage that you cause to third parties with your motorbike. However, depending on the situation, supplementary insurance can also be extremely worthwhile.

Single vehicle or comprehensive insurance?
Single vehicle accidental damage insurance covers damage to your own motorbike that you have not caused yourself. This includes damage caused by theft, vandalism (e.g. spraying of paint), natural hazards (e.g. hail, stone impact and flooding), fire, glass damage incl. headlights, collisions with animals or marten bites. With comprehensive insurance, damage to the motorbike is insured even in the event of accidents for which you are responsible, e.g. a fall – which is why we recommend comprehensive insurance especially for newer motorbikes.

Everything related to your bike
Not only can you insure your motorbike against theft or accidental damage; you can also insure your protective clothing, the belongings you take with you, such as smartphones, tablets and navigation devices, as well as accessories, which are automatically insured with up to 10 percent of the catalog price. This includes equipment that goes beyond standard items, for example a top case, luggage racks, brackets and covers. Items you have with you are insured with up to 5,000 Swiss francs in single vehicle accidental damage insurance. Protective clothing can be insured as an additional option. This is also insured if you or persons living in the same household use motorbikes belonging to third parties.

Accident insurance
Accident insurance protects you and passengers on your motorbike against the financial consequences of an accident. It pays benefits in the event of death, disability and temporary inability to work, and pays a daily hospital benefit during a stay in hospital. Medical expenses within five years following the day of the accident are also insured. In the event of in-patient treatment in hospital, we even cover the costs for a private ward. Protection against gross negligence is also advisable. So you don't need to worry about cuts in benefits – even if you accidentally run a red light.

No accident is the best protection

The best protection is of course to avoid accidents if possible:

  • Prepare yourself mentally before each ride. Go through the route in your head and try to visualize a difficult situation or an emergency stop.

  • A helmet isn't the only thing you need; every piece of clothing should protect you in some way. Protectors on your back, shoulders, buttocks and hips reduce the risk of bone fractures considerably. In addition, we recommend motorcycle boots with a high shaft and abrasion-resistant gloves.

  • Riding a motorbike puts significant strain on the neck, wrists and fingers. We therefore recommend strengthening exercises for the neck and supporting muscles as well as finger training, such as with a stress ball.

  • The narrow silhouette of a motorcyclist can be overlooked easily. Make yourself as visible as possible with conspicuous clothing and illuminated protectors and always switch on the low-beam headlamp.

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